In the morning we could appreciate area properly. The beach stretched for miles and miles, with clean sand and clear blue water. The camp was fairly remote, the surrounding area being sparcely populated with little shacks built from woven palm fronds and set amongst the coconut palms and mango trees which were the dominant flora. Everywhere were coconuts and mangos. My sister and I invested a fair amount of time learning the difficult art of de-husking a dried coconut. Contrary to what many may believe, they don’t come in a nice hard shell ready to be cracked, but a very tough and thick husk which is devillishly difficult to remove. The mangoes were much easier, they came in a plastic bag, carried by an african dude. Also on offer was any seafood delight you could care to imagine. The fishing boats would come in every morning and guys would wonder around peddling their catch of the day. Over the few days we were there we had barracuda curry, rock cod with crayfish, and plenty of prawns and calamari. It was seafood bliss. This was complimented by the other local produce, cashew nuts, which are sold in big bags all along the road, and Portugeuese bread rolls, called pao, which are made in tiny little ovens in tiny little huts all around the area and can be bought freshly baked for a few cents a roll.

Having seen the huge fish the local spear-fishermen were bringing in, my dad and I were keen to give it a go. We drove to a lovely beach a bit further south and put on our wetsuits and swam out. It was about a km swim before we hit the reef. It was bit scary floating out there and seeing how tiny the car looked on the beach, so I mainly kept my head down. The reef was really beautiful with lots of coral, gulleys and big arches of rock through which the numerous reef fish swam. But we weren’t allowed to shoot reef fish unfortunately and we didn’t see too many game fish. We did see one, which my dad had a shot at, but with his little freshwater speargun, the spear didn’t go through. On one of our outings I swam through a big school of we later decided were barracuda, but by the time I had worked out what I was looking at the school had disappeared. In the end we failed to provide for the family, but we did have a good few hours of good snorkelling, seeing lots of colourful coral, reef fish, sharks and dad even saw a big turtle.
New Years was a fairly quiet one, with the inhabitants of the camp, mostly South Africans, gathering on the beach for a big bonfire. Later the camp did a fireworks display which was quite impressive given the remoteness of the place. Sophie and I slept on the beach, to be woken by the first light of 2010, and we started the year with beautiful early morning swim.
It was all too soon before Morrungulo was at an end and we sadly had to pack up the camp. My family had to leave to get back to work, but we decided to drive up the coast a bit and spend another night. So a couple hours after they had left, we ambled off and headed up the coast to Vilanculos.

In the morning we could appreciate the area properly. The beach stretched for miles and miles, with clean sand and clear blue water. The camp was fairly remote, the surrounding area being sparcely populated with little shacks built from woven palm fronds and set amongst the coconut palms and mango trees which were the dominant flora. Everywhere were coconuts and mangos. My sister and I invested a fair amount of time learning the difficult art of de-husking a dried coconut. Contrary to what many may believe, they don’t come in a nice hard shell ready to be cracked, but a very tough and thick husk which is devillishly difficult to remove. The mangoes were much easier, they came in a plastic bag, carried by an african dude. Also on offer was any seafood delight you could care to imagine. The fishing boats would come in every morning and guys would wonder around peddling their catch of the day. Over the few days we were there we had barracuda curry, rock cod with crayfish, and plenty of prawns and calamari. It was seafood bliss. This was complimented by the other local produce, cashew nuts, which are sold in big bags all along the road, and Portuguese bread rolls, called pao, which are made in tiny little ovens in tiny little huts all around the area and can be bought freshly baked for a few cents a roll.

Having seen the huge fish the local spear-fishermen were bringing in, my dad and I were keen to give it a go. We drove to a lovely beach a bit further south and put on our wetsuits and swam out. It was about a km swim before we hit the reef. It was bit scary floating out there and seeing how tiny the car looked on the beach, so I mainly kept my head down. The reef was really beautiful with lots of coral, gulleys and big arches of rock through which the numerous reef fish swam. But we weren’t allowed to shoot reef fish unfortunately and we didn’t see too many game fish. We did see one, which my dad had a shot at, but with his little freshwater speargun, the spear didn’t go through. On one of our outings I swam through a big school of we later decided were barracuda, but by the time I had worked out what I was looking at the school had disappeared. In the end we failed to provide for the family, but we did have a good few hours of good snorkelling, seeing lots of colourful coral, reef fish, sharks and even saw a big turtle.

New Years was a fairly quiet one, with the inhabitants of the camp, mostly South Africans, gathering on the beach for a big bonfire. Later the camp did a fireworks display which was quite impressive given the remoteness of the place. Sophie and I slept on the beach, to be woken by the first light of 2010, and we started the year with beautiful early morning swim.

It was all too soon before Morrungulo was at an end and we had to pack up the camp. My family had to leave to get back to work, but we decided to drive up the coast a bit and spend another night. So a couple hours after they had left, we ambled off and headed up the coast to Vilanculos.